In defense of the TERF, because we are all,in fact, TERFS.

So, I’ve been an online TERF for quite a while now, and I’m more than aware what a murky core lies beneath the surface of trans ideology. This week, I saw it, in action, in the real world, and it doesn’t get any prettier, close up.

On Valentine’s night, I had the privilege of attending a woman’s event organised by women, for women, about women. A Woman’s Place U.K. had hired out a Leith venue to facilitate a much needed conversation on gender recognition and where current and future legislation impacts on women’s rights. The fact that it sold out, well in advance, is an indication of women’s interest in this subject, and their desire to speak openly about it. So far, so pedestrian.

Except, the night, as it unfolded was anything but average. To access the venue, women had to walk past  a masked mob, banging drums. The group, calling themselves Sisters Uncut were there to protest the meeting being allowed to proceed. Women shouldn’t be allowed meet with other women to talk about stuff that affects women. See? If you are finding it difficult to understand their motivation, then it will not help at all if I tell you they are a domestic violence collective. Yes, you read that right. A group whose primary purpose is to draw attention to the huge deficit in government funding for domestic violence victims, spends its time and resources opposing women centered meetings.

Far be it for me to tell any group how to organise, but it’s difficult to comprehend how stopping women meeting to talk publicly about women’s things, including domestic violence, in any way furthers the aims of the group. It would, in fact, seem counter intuitive. What thrives in secrecy? Domestic violence.

That’s why I’m starting to suspect that Sister’s Uncut isn’t an anti domestic violence collective as much as the almost armed faction of the trans activist community. The ones on the ground, willing to do the dirty work, in order to back up the insidious threats their bots, trolls and armchair activists spawn on-line. It is impossible to have sentient awareness of domestic violence and simultaneously threaten and intimidate women for participating in public life.

It was this thought that occurred to me most, as I sat in the meeting, surrounded by women speaking about their lived in experience as women, and tuneless drums attempted to drown out their individual and collective voices. It didn’t work. The women spoke louder, as so often happens, when you try and quieten them down.

For those of you reading, who think none of this matters ‘coz TERFS are just bad people, and they shouldn’t be allowed to meet in public. Ask yourself, have you ever met one? Have you ever conversed with one? Have you ever held the hand of one, as they went through a psychiatric assessment, or a rape exam, or a police interview? TERFS are women who know their own boundaries, and won’t move the goalposts to suit the whims of a minority. TERFS are women who know that the term ladycock is an oxymoron. TERFS are women who reject the term CIS for the meaningless paradox that it is. TERFS are women who were told not to ask questions, but raised their hands anyway.

At a deeper, and more profound level, we’re all TERFS. Every last one of us. Even the transfolk. See what i did there? Used trans as noun? Classic TERFdem. If you don’t know that, you’re probably a TERF. ‘Coz we all know the difference between a man and a woman. It’s not our fault. It’s hard-wired into our D.N.A. and vital to our ability to survive and propagate. It’s as in-ate to us as our ability to smell and see. Why we have chosen to collectively lie, I cannot speculate, but because we all know we are lying, there is no escaping the truth. We are all TERFS.







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